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Madeline Miller wins 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction

19.15pm, London, 30 May 2012 — American author Madeline Miller has won the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction with her debut novel The Song of Achilles (Bloomsbury).

2012 marks the seventeenth year of the Orange Prize, which celebrates excellence, originality and accessibility in women’s writing from throughout the world.

At an awards ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, London - hosted by Orange Prize for Fiction Co-Founder and Honorary Director, Kate Mosse - the 2012 Chair of Judges, Joanna Trollope, presented the author with the £30,000 prize and the ‘Bessie’, a limited edition bronze figurine. Both are anonymously endowed.

Joanna Trollope, Chair of Judges, said: “This is a more than worthy winner — original, passionate, inventive and uplifting. Homer would be proud of her.”

The Orange Prize for Fiction was set up in 1996 to celebrate and promote fiction written by women throughout the world to the widest range of readers possible. The Orange Prize is awarded to the best novel of the year written in English by a woman.

The judges for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction are:

Joanna Trollope, (Chair), Writer

Lisa Appignanesi, Writer, Novelist and Broadcaster

Victoria Derbyshire, Journalist and Broadcaster

Natalie Haynes, Writer and Broadcaster

Natasha Kaplinsky, Broadcaster

Stuart Jackson, Communications Director at Orange, said: “This year’s shortlist was wonderfully varied and international but even from such an exceptional shortlist, there can only be one winner — many congratulations to Madeline Miller.”

Madeline Miller Madeline Miller was born in Boston, MA, and grew up in both New York City and Philadelphia. She attended Brown University, where she graduated magna cum laude with a BA and MA in Classics. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama specialising in adapting classical tales to a modern audience. Since graduation she has taught Latin, Greek and Shakespeare, both at her high school, The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, PA, and elsewhere. Madeline began writing fiction when she was in high school, and has been working on The Song of Achilles, her first novel, for the last ten years. She currently lives in New England, where she teaches Latin and writes.

The Song of Achilles Greece in the age of Heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to Phthia to live in the shadow of King Peleus and his strong, beautiful son, Achilles. By all rights their paths should never cross, but Achilles takes the shamed prince as his friend, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something far deeper — despite the displeasure of Achilles’s mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess. But then word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus journeys with Achilles to Troy, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

Previous winners of the Orange Prize are Téa Obreht for The Tiger’s Wife (2011), Barbara Kingsolver for The Lacuna (2010), Marilynne Robinson for Home (2009), Rose Tremain for The Road Home (2008), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for Half of a Yellow Sun (2007), Zadie Smith for On Beauty (2006), Lionel Shriver for We Need to Talk About Kevin (2005), Andrea Levy for Small Island (2004), Valerie Martin for Property (2003), Ann Patchett for Bel Canto (2002), Kate Grenville for The Idea of Perfection (2001), Linda Grant for When I Lived in Modern Times (2000), Suzanne Berne for A Crime in the Neighbourhood (1999), Carol Shields for Larry’s Party (1998), Anne Michaels for Fugitive Pieces (1997), and Helen Dunmore for A Spell of Winter (1996).

The awards took place in The Clore Ballroom of the Royal Festival Hall, central London and guests toasted the announcement of the winner at a champagne drinks reception courtesy of Taittinger. In addition to the Orange Prize for Fiction winner announcement, aspiring novelist Jennifer Cullen was named as the winner of the Orange/Grazia First Chapter Competition for unpublished writers.


Press Enquiries:

Amanda Johnson or Alex Wilkinson at M&C Saatchi:

Tel: 020 7544 3872/0207 544 3855 or 07715 922 180/07969 573 313

Email: amanda.johnson@mcsaatchi.com or alex.wilkinson@mcsaatchi.com

If you would like to request an interview with Madeline Miller after 31st May, please contact Katie Bond at Bloomsbury on (0) 207 631 5730 or at katie.bond@bloomsbury.com

Notes to Editors

About Orange UK

Orange is the key brand of the France Telecom Group, one of the world's leading telecommunications operators. With almost 131 million customers, the Orange brand now covers Internet, television and mobile services in the majority of countries where the Group operates.

In the UK, Orange provides high quality GSM coverage to 99% of the UK population, and 3G coverage to more than 93%.

Orange and any other Orange product or service names included in this material are trademarks of Orange Brand Services Limited.

On July 1 2010, the company became part of Everything Everywhere, one company that runs two of Britain's most famous brands - Orange UK and T-Mobile UK - with plans to transform the industry by giving customers instant access to everything, everywhere, offering them the best value, best choice and best network coverage in the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is the UK’s biggest communications company, with a combined customer base of almost 28 million people and more than 720 retail stores across the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is registered at Hatfield Business Park, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9BW under the registered company number 02382161.

For more information please call the Orange Press Office 0870 3731500, or visit www.orange.co.uk/newsroom


Letter from Kate Mosse

In 1996 we founded the Prize for Fiction to celebrate and promote the very best of international fiction written by women. This ambitious undertaking was only made possible with the help of Orange, who immediately recognised the importance of our cause and signed as title sponsor and partner.

Seventeen wonderful years later this partnership has delivered more than we ever hoped for, the Prize has gone on to become one of the most significant global literary awards.

But all good things must come to an end and we can now confirm that 2012 will be the final year of Orange’s association.

On behalf of everyone on the Prize for Fiction Women’s Committee, I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the hard work of all those at Orange, past and present, for their investment, passion, support and never ending enthusiasm.

This is the end of an era, but no major arts project should stand still. We are very much looking forward to developing the Prize for the future and working with a new sponsor to ensure the Prize grows and plays an even more significant part in the years to come.

We are in active discussions with a number of potential new brand partners and look forward to the start of another exciting chapter for the Prize.

Kate Mosse
Co-Founder & Honorary Director of the Prize for Fiction

- For sponsorship enquiries, click here


ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION 2012 AT SOUTHBANK CENTRE

London, 24 April 2012: Southbank Centre will host a series of events in May celebrating the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction.

Join Orange and Grazia on 28 May in the Purcell Room at their second writers’ evening, chaired by Orange Prize co-founder and international No 1 bestselling novelist, Kate Mosse. Kate will be in discussion with author Rosamund Lupton, whose debut novel, Sisters, has sold over half a million copies to date and was featured on Richard and Judy’s Book Club, as well as Radio 4's Book at Bedtime. The second half of the programme will be a ‘Writers’ Clinic’ where audience members will have the chance to grill a panel of experts about how to get published. The panel includes Literary Agent Felicity Blunt of Curtis Brown - whose authors include Pulitzer winner and Orange Prize longlisted Jennifer Egan, author of A Visit from the Goon Squad, Rosamund Lupton and the Estate of Daphne du Maurier - as well as Candida Lacey, Managing Director of independent publisher Myriad Editions, who specialise in publishing new literary fiction, including Amazon Best Book of the Year 2011 winner, Elizabeth Haynes.

Tuesday 29 May sees the return of the incredibly popular Orange Prize Shortlist Readings at Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. Chair of judges, Joanna Trollope, will host the event with shortlisted authors reading and discussing their work. The 2012 shortlist is Esi Edugyan for Half Blood Blues, Anne Enright for The Forgotten Waltz, Georgina Harding for Painter of Silence, Madeline Miller for The Song of Achilles, Cynthia Ozick for Foreign Bodies and Ann Patchett for State of Wonder.

For more information visit www.orangeprize.co.uk

Listings Information:

Monday 28 May 2012: Orange and Grazia Writers’ Evening

Venue: Purcell Room, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX
Details: How to get your first novel published - Orange and Grazia evening for aspiring writers at the South Bank

Whether you have written your first draft, or are yet to write the first sentence, join Orange and Grazia at a special writers’ evening, chaired by Orange Prize co-founder and bestselling novelist, Kate Mosse, to get the best advice in the publishing business.

An event of two parts, the first sees Kate in discussion with bestselling author Rosamund Lupton, whose 2010 debut novel Sister has sold over half a million copies to date and was featured on Richard and Judy’s Book Club and Radio 4's Book at Bedtime. Rosamund will be discussing her creative inspiration and how she finally got the novel she had been writing for five years published.

Kate Mosse will then chair an interactive ‘Writers’ Clinic’ where you can grill a panel of publishing experts including Literary Agent Felicity Blunt of Curtis Brown and Candida Lacey, Managing Director of independent publisher of original fiction, Myriad Editions, about how to get your first book published.
Time: 6.45pm
Tickets: Available from www.southbankcentre.co.uk or 0844 847 9910 at £10.00.

Tuesday 29 May 2012: Orange Prize Shortlist Readings

Venue: Queen Elizabeth Hall, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX
Details: Chair of judges, Joanna Trollope, hosts an evening of readings and discussion with the authors shortlisted for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction.
Time: 7.30pm
Tickets: Available from www.southbankcentre.co.uk or 0844 847 9910 at £12.00.


2012 Orange Prize for Fiction

ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION ANNOUNCES 2012 SHORTLIST

Orange Prize for Fiction Awards Ceremony at Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre: 30 May 2012

London, 9.30am, 17 April 2012:The Orange Prize for Fiction, the UK’s only annual book award for fiction written by a woman, today announces the 2012 shortlist. Now in its seventeenth year, the Prize celebrates excellence, originality and accessibility in women’s writing throughout the world.


Esi Edugyan Half Blood Blues Serpent’s Tail Canadian 2nd Novel
Anne Enright The Forgotten Waltz Jonathan Cape Irish 5th Novel
Georgina Harding Painter of Silence Bloomsbury British 3rd Novel
Madeline Miller The Song of Achilles Bloomsbury American 1st Novel
Cynthia Ozick Foreign Bodies Atlantic Books American 7th Novel
Ann Patchett State of Wonder Bloomsbury American 6th Novel

The judges for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction are:

This year’s shortlist honours both new and well-established authors, including a debut novelist and a previous Orange Prize winner; Ann Patchett, who won the Orange Prize for Fiction ten years ago for Bel Canto (2002).

“This is a shortlist of remarkable quality and variety,” commented Joanna Trollope, Chair of judges. “It includes six distinctive voices and subjects, four nationalities and an age range of close on half a century. It is a privilege to present it.”

She continues, "My only regret is that the rules of the prize don't permit a longer shortlist. However, I am confident that the fourteen novels we had to leave out will make their own well-deserved way".

The Prize was set up in 1996 to celebrate and promote fiction by women throughout the world to the widest range of readers possible and is awarded for the best novel of the year written by a woman.

The winner will be presented with a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze statue known as ‘the Bessie’, created by artist Grizel Niven. Both are anonymously endowed.

“The Orange Prize has gone from strength to strength over the years and has established itself as a major international prize," commented Stuart Jackson, Communications Director at Orange. “This is an exceptional shortlist reflecting the diversity and incredible range of female fiction that is available to readers today. Our judges have done a terrific job and will have a tough time choosing just one winner next month from this stellar shortlist of six.”

The award ceremony will take place in The Clore Ballroom, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, London, on 30 May 2012.

Previous winners are Téa Obreht for The Tiger’s Wife (2011), Barbara Kingsolver for The Lacuna (2010), Marilynne Robinson for Home (2009), Rose Tremain for The Road Home (2008), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for Half of a Yellow Sun (2007), Zadie Smith for On Beauty (2006), Lionel Shriver for We Need to Talk About Kevin (2005), Andrea Levy for Small Island (2004), Valerie Martin for Property (2003), Ann Patchett for Bel Canto (2002), Kate Grenville for The Idea of Perfection (2001), Linda Grant for When I Lived in Modern Times (2000), Suzanne Berne for A Crime in the Neighbourhood (1999), Carol Shields for Larry’s Party (1998), Anne Michaels for Fugitive Pieces (1997), and Helen Dunmore for A Spell of Winter (1996).

Orange Prize for Fiction 2012 Dates for the Diary:

About Orange UK

Orange is the key brand of the France Telecom Group, one of the world's leading telecommunications operators. With almost 131 million customers, the Orange brand now covers Internet, television and mobile services in the majority of countries where the Group operates.

In the UK, Orange provides high quality GSM coverage to 99% of the UK population, and 3G coverage to more than 93%.

Orange and any other Orange product or service names included in this material are trademarks of Orange Brand Services Limited.

On July 1 2010, the company became part of Everything Everywhere, one company that runs two of Britain's most famous brands - Orange UK and T-Mobile UK - with plans to transform the industry by giving customers instant access to everything, everywhere, offering them the best value, best choice and best network coverage in the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is the UK’s biggest communications company, with a combined customer base of almost 28 million people and more than 720 retail stores across the country.

Everything Everywhere Limited is registered at Hatfield Business Park, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9BW under the registered company number 02382161.

For more information please call the Orange Press Office 0870 3731500, or visit www.orange.co.uk/newsroom

Synopses and Biographies

Esi Edugyan

Half Blood Blues

Serpent’s Tail

The aftermath of the fall of Paris, 1940. Hieronymus Falk, a rising star on the cabaret scene, was arrested in a café and never heard from again. He was twenty years old. He was a German citizen. And he was black.

Fifty years later, Sid, Hiero’s bandmate and the only witness that day, is going back to Berlin. Persuaded by his old friend Chip, Sid discovers there’s more to the journey than he thought when Chip shares a mysterious letter, bringing to the surface secrets buried since Hiero’s fate was settled.

Esi Edugyan is a graduate of the University of Victoria and John Hopkins University. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, including Best New American Voices 2003. Her debut novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, written when she was 25, was published internationally. Half Blood Blues was shortlisted for the 2011 Man Booker Prize and won the Scotiabank Giller Prize 2011. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

The judges said: “We were all struck by the sustained and powerful voice, and sense of place and period, in this wonderful novel of jazz, war-torn Europe, and remorse.”

Anne Enright

The Forgotten Waltz

Jonathan Cape

The Forgotten Waltz is a memory of desire: a recollection of the bewildering speed of attraction, the irreparable slip into longing. In Terenure, a pleasant suburb of Dublin, in the winter of 2009, it has snowed. Gina Moynihan, girl about town, recalls the trail of lust and happenstance that brought her to fall for ‘the love of her life’, Seán Vallely. As the city outside comes to a halt, Gina remembers the days of their affair in one hotel room or another: long afternoons made blank by bliss and denial. Now, as the silent streets and the stillness and vertigo of the falling snow make the day luminous and full of possibility, Gina walks through the weather to meet a girl she calls his ‘beautiful mistake’: Seán’s fragile, twelve-year-old daughter, Evie.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two volumes of stories, collected as Yesterday’s Weather, one book of non-fiction, Making Babies, and four novels, most recently The Gathering, which was the Irish Novel of the Year and won the Irish Fiction Award and the 2007 Man Booker Prize.

The judges said: “What an achievement, we all thought — a flawed heroine, a modern tale of unromantic adultery and conflicted parental loyalties, and a compelling, believable, lyrical read.”

Georgina Harding

Painter of Silence

Bloomsbury

Iasi, Romania, the early 1950s. A man is found on the steps of hospital, frail as a fallen bird. He carries no identification and utters no words, and it is days before anyone discovers that he is deaf and mute. And then a young nurse called Safta brings paper and pencils with which he can draw. Slowly, painstakingly, memories appear on the page: a hillside, a stable, a car, a country house, dogs and mirrored rooms and samovars in what is now a lost world.

The memories are Safta’s also. For the man is Augustin, son of the cook at the manor at Poiana that was her family home. Born six months apart, they grew up with a connection that bypassed words. But while Augustin’s world remained the same size, Safta’s expanded to embrace languages, society — and love, as Augustin watched one long hot summer, in the form of a fleeting young man in a green Lagonda.

Safta left before the war, Augustin stayed. But even in the wide hills and valleys around Poiana he did not escape its horrors. He watched uncomprehending as armies passed through the place. Then the Communists came, and he found himself their unlikely victim. There are many things that he must tell Safta that may be more than simple drawings can convey.

Georgina Harding is the author of two novels: The Solitude of Thomas Cave and The Spy Game, a BBC Book at Bedtime and shortlisted for the Encore Award. Her first book was a work of non-fiction, In Another Europe, recording a journey she made across Romania by motorbike in 1988 during the worst times of the Ceausescu regime. It was followed by Tranquebar: A Season in South India, which documented the lives of the people in a small fishing village on the Coromandel coast. Georgina Harding lives in London and on a farm in the Stour Valley, Essex.

The judges said: “We were impressed by this deceptively quiet book, which grows in effect and strength as it goes on, portraying a deep understanding of unconventional ways of self-expression, and of relationships. The writing is beautiful.”

Madeline Miller

The Song of Achilles

Bloomsbury

Greece in the age of Heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to Phthia to live in the shadow of King Peleus and his strong, beautiful son, Achilles. By all rights their paths should never cross, but Achilles takes the shamed prince as his friend, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something far deeper — despite the displeasure of Achilles’s mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess. But then word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus journeys with Achilles to Troy, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

Madeline Miller was born in Boston, MA, and grew up in both New York City and Philadelphia. She attended Brown University, where she graduated magna cum laude with a BA and MA in Classics. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama specialising in adapting classical tales to a modern audience. Since graduation she has taught Latin, Greek and Shakespeare, both at her high school, The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, PA, and elsewhere. Madeline began writing fiction when she was in high school, and has been working on The Song of Achilles, her first novel, for the last ten years. She currently lives in New England, where she teaches Latin and writes.

The judges said: “Terrific. The Trojan Wars and the legendary love story of Patroclus and Achilles told with all the intensity and accuracy that this world of violence and superstition and romance deserves.”

Cynthia Ozick

Foreign Bodies

Atlantic Books

The collapse of her brief marriage has stalled Bea Nightingale’s life, leaving her middle-aged and alone, teaching in an impoverished borough of 1950s New York. A plea from her estranged brother gives Bea the excuse to escape lassitude by leaving for Paris to retrieve a nephew she barely knows; but the siren call of Europe threatens to deafen Bea to the dangers of entangling herself in the lives of her brother’s family.

Travelling from America to France, Bea leaves the stigma of divorce on the far side of the Atlantic; newly liberated, she chooses to defend her nephew and his girlfriend Lili by waging a war of letters on the brother she has promised to help. But Bea’s generosity is a mixed blessing: those she tries to help seem to be harmed, and as Bea’s family unravels around her, she finds herself once again drawn to the husband she thought she had left in the past.

Cynthia Ozick's novels, essays, and short stories have won numerous prizes and awards, among them the Presidential Medal for the Humanities and the PEN-Nabokov Award for Lifetime Achievement. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Man-Booker International Prize, and her fiction has garnered four O. Henry First Prizes, the Rea Award for the Short Story, the PEN-Malamud Award for the Short Story, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for the Essay. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she lives in Westchester County, New York, with her husband.

The judges said: “This novel is so fresh, and so sophisticated, in its clear eyed look at family dynamics, and so exquisitely written — we were charmed by it.”

Ann Patchett

State of Wonder

Bloomsbury

Among the tangled waterways and giant anacondas of the Brazilian Rio Negro, an enigmatic scientist is developing a drug that could alter the lives of women forever. Dr Annick Swenson’s work is shrouded in mystery; she refuses to report on her progress, especially to her investor’s, whose patience is fast running out. Anders Eckman, a mild-mannered lab researcher, is sent to investigate. A curt letter reporting his untimely death is all that returns.

Now Marina Singh, Anders’s colleague and once a student of the mighty Dr Swenson, is their last hope. Compelled by pleas of Anders’s wife, who refuses to accept that her husband is not coming home, Marina leaves the snowy plains of Minnesota and retraces her friend’s steps into the heart of the South American darkness, determined to track down Dr Swenson and uncover the secrets being jealously guarded among the remotest tribes of the rainforest.

What Marina does not yet know is that, in this ancient corner of the jungle, where the muddy waters and susurrating grasses hide countless unknown perils and temptations, she will face challenges beyond her wildest imagination. Marina is no longer the student, but only time will tell if she has learnt enough.

Ann Patchett is the author of five previous novels, including Bel Canto, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction. She is also the author of two works of nonfiction; What Now? and the bestselling Truth & Beauty. She writes for the New York Times Magazine, Elle, GQ, Financial Times, Paris Review and Vogue. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee where she has her own independent bookshop. In April 2012, Ann Patchett was named by Time Magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

The judges said: “An extraordinary novel of science and adventure handled with equally extraordinary grace and lightness and wit.”


ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION ANNOUNCES 2012 LONGLIST

Orange Prize for Fiction shortlist announcement: 17 April

Orange Prize for Fiction shortlist readings: 29 May

Awards ceremony: 30 May

London, 08 March 2012: The Orange Prize for Fiction, the UK's only annual book award for fiction written by a woman, today announces the 2012 longlist. Now in its seventeenth year, the Prize celebrates excellence, originality and accessibility in women's writing throughout the world. The announcement coincides with International Women's Day 2012.

Click here to buy the Orange Prize for Fiction longlist from the Orange Book Club

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The judges for the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction are:

"I am very proud of this year's Orange longlist," commented Joanna Trollope, Chair of Judges. "It not only demonstrates the judges' eye for quality, but is also evidence of the breadth of subject matter, and individuality of voice, in women's writing today.".

She continues, "We were looking for excellence, accessibility and originality, and we found all three, over and over. I congratulate the twenty chosen writers warmly."

The Prize was set up in 1996 to celebrate and promote international fiction by women throughout the world to the widest range of readers possible and is awarded for the best novel of the year written by a woman in the English language.

Stuart Jackson, Communications Director at Orange said, "This year's judges have selected a terrific longlist which showcases the exceptional diversity and quality of international women's fiction available to readers today."

This year's longlist honours both new and well-established writers, featuring five first novels alongside a previous Orange Prize winner, Ann Patchett, who is longlisted for her sixth novel, and previous Orange Award for New Writers winner, Francesca Kay, longlisted for her second novel. Three authors appearing on this year's list have previously been longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, and a further four authors have been previously shortlisted.

Any woman writing in English, whatever her nationality, country of residence, age or subject matter, is eligible. The winner will receive a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze known as a 'Bessie', created and donated by the artist Grizel Niven. Both are anonymously endowed.

The winner will be announced at an awards ceremony to be held in The Ballroom at the Royal Festival Hall on 30 May 2012.

Previous winners are Téa Obreht for The Tiger's Wife (2011), Barbara Kingsolver for The Lacuna (2010), Marilynne Robinson for Home (2009), Rose Tremain for The Road Home (2008), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for Half of a Yellow Sun (2007), Zadie Smith for On Beauty (2006), Lionel Shriver for We Need to Talk About Kevin (2005), Andrea Levy for Small Island (2004), Valerie Martin for Property (2003), Ann Patchett for Bel Canto (2002), Kate Grenville for The Idea of Perfection (2001), Linda Grant for When I Lived in Modern Times (2000), Suzanne Berne for A Crime in the Neighbourhood (1999), Carol Shields for Larry's Party (1998), Anne Michaels for Fugitive Pieces (1997), and Helen Dunmore for A Spell of Winter (1996).

For more information or to speak to the 2012 Chair of Judges, Joanna Trollope, please contact:

Press Enquiries:
Amanda Johnson at M&C Saatchi:
Tel: 020 7544 3872 or 07715 922 180
Email: amanda.johnson@mcsaatchi.com

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Notes to Editors

  • This year's list carries eight British authors, seven American authors, three Irish authors, one Swedish author and one Canadian author.
  • The following author has previously won the Orange Prize for Fiction: Ann Patchett (2002)
  • The following authors have previously been shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction: Emma Donoghue (2011), Jane Harris (2007), Ann Patchett (1998) and Ali Smith (2006, 2001).
  • The following authors have previously been longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction: Roopa Farooki (2010), Anne Enright (2008) and A.L Kennedy (2000, 1996).
  • The following author has previously won the Orange Award for New Writers: Francesca Kay (2009).
  • The following author has previously been shortlisted for the Orange Award for New Writers: Roopa Farooki (2007).
  • There are five first novels on the 2012 longlist.

About Orange

Orange is the key brand of the France Telecom Group, one of the world's leading telecommunications operators. With almost 131 million customers, the Orange brand now covers Internet, television and mobile services in the majority of countries where the Group operates.

In the UK, Orange provides high quality GSM coverage to 99% of the UK population, and 3G coverage to more than 93%.

Orange and any other Orange product or service names included in this material are trade marks of Orange Brand Services Limited.

On July 1 2010, the company became part of Everything Everywhere, one company that runs two of Britain's most famous brands - Orange UK and T-Mobile UK - with plans to transform the industry by giving customers instant access to everything, everywhere, offering them the best value, best choice and best network coverage in the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is the UK's biggest communications company, with a combined customer base of almost 28 million people and more than 720 retail stores across the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is registered at Hatfield Business Park, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9BW under the registered company number 02382161.

For more information please call the Orange Press Office 0870 3731500, or visit www.orange.co.uk/newsroom

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Synopses and Biographies

Karin Altenberg
Island of Wings

Quercus

July, 1830. On the ten-hour sailing west from the Hebrides to the islands of St Kilda, everything lies ahead for Lizzie and Neil MacKenzie. Neil is to become the minister to the small community of islanders and Lizzie, his new wife, is pregnant with their first child. Neil's journey is evangelical: a testing and strengthening of his own faith against the old pagan ways of the St Kildans, but it is also a passage to atonement. For Lizzie – bright, beautiful and devoted – this is an adventure, a voyage into the unknown.

As the two adjust to life on an exposed archipelago on the edge of civilisation, where natives live in squalor and babies perish mysteriously in their first week, their marriage – and their sanity – is threatened. Is Lizzie a wilful temptress drawing him away from his faith? Is Neil's zealous Christianity unhinging into madness? And who, or what, is haunting the moors and cliff-tops?

Born and brought up in southern Sweden, Karin Altenberg moved to Britain to study in 1996. She holds a PhD in archaeology from the University of Reading. Recently, she has worked in the fields of international arts management and cultural heritage. She is a fellow of the Linnean Society of London.

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Aifric Campbell
On the Floor

Serpent's Tail

At 28, Geri Molloy is a major player at a London investment bank, earning six figures trading with a reclusive hedge fund manager who won't deal with anyone else on the floor. She looks like a woman holding her own in a man's world, but her success is an illusion. Geri doesn't own her life at all.

On the eve of the 1991 Gulf War, everything begins to unravel. Abandoned by her boyfriend, gripped by insomnia and drinking way too much, Geri is close to losing it – in every sense.

Aifric Campbell was born in Ireland and grew up in Dublin. She spent thirteen years as an investment banker in London and now lives in Sussex. She teaches at Imperial College and is the author of two previous novels; The Semantics of Murder and The Loss Adjustor.

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Leah Hager Cohen
The Grief of Others

The Clerkenwell Press

The Ryries have suffered a loss: the death of a baby just fifty-seven hours after his birth. Parents John and Ricky struggle to regain a semblance of normalcy for themselves and for their two older children. Yet in the aftermath of the baby's death, long-supressed uncertainties about their relationship come roiling to the surface. A dreadful secret emerges with reverberations that reach far into their past and threaten their future.

Ten-year-old Biscuit and thirteen-year-old Paul begin to act out in exquisitely – perhaps courageously – idiosyncratic ways. But as the four family members scatter into private, isolating grief, an unexpected visitor arrives, and they all find themselves growing more alert to the sadness and burdens of others.

Leah Hager Cohen is the author of four non-fiction books, including Train Go Sorry and Glass, Paper, Beans and three novels, most recently House Lights. The New York Times has named four of her books 'Notable Books of the Year'. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Book Review.

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Emma Donoghue
The Sealed Letter

Picador

After a separation of many years, Emily 'Fido' Faithfull bumps into her old friend Helen Codrington on the streets of Victorian London. Much has changed: Helen is more and more unhappy in her marriage to the older Vice-Admiral Codrington, while Fido has become a successful woman of business and a pioneer in the British Women's Movement. But, for all her independence of mind, Fido is too trusting of her once-dear companion and finds herself drawn into aiding Helen's obsessive affair with a young army officer.

When the Vice-Admiral seizes the children and sues for divorce, the women's friendship unravels amid accusations of adultery and counter-accusations of cruelty and attempted rape, as well as a mysterious 'sealed letter' that could destroy more than one life….

Born in 1969, Emma Donoghue is an Irish writer who spent eight years in England before moving to Canada. Her fiction includes Slammerkin, Life Mask, Touchy Subjects and the international bestseller Room, shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction and Man Booker Prize.

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Esi Edugyan
Half Blood Blues

Serpent's Tail

The aftermath of the fall of Paris, 1940. Hieronymus Falk, a rising star on the cabaret scene, was arrested in a café and never heard from again. He was twenty years old. He was a German citizen. And he was black.

Fifty years later, Sid, Hiero's bandmate and the only witness that day, is going back to Berlin. Persuaded by his old friend Chip, Sid discovers there's more to the journey than he thought when Chip shares a mysterious letter, bringing to the surface secrets buried since Hiero's fate was settled.

Esi Edugyan is a graduate of the University of Victoria and Johns Hopkins University. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, including Best New American Voices 2003. Her debut novel, The Second Life of Samuel Tyne, was published internationally and Half Blood Blues was shortlisted for the 2011 Man Booker Prize. She lives in Canada.

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Anne Enright
The Forgotten Waltz

Jonathan Cape

The Forgotten Waltz is a memory of desire: a recollection of the bewildering speed of attraction, the irreparable slip into longing. In Terenure, a pleasant suburb of Dublin, in the winter of 2009, it has snowed. Gina Moynihan, girl about town, recalls the trail of lust and happenstance that brought her to fall for 'the love of her life', Seán Vallely. AS the city outside comes to a halt, Gina remembers the days of their affair in one hotel room or another: long afternoons made blank by bliss and denial. Now, as the silent streets and the stillness and vertigo of the falling snow make the day luminous and full of possibility, Gina walks through the weather to meet a girl she calls his 'beautiful mistake': Seán's fragile, twelve-year-old daughter, Evie.

Anne Enright was born in Dublin, where she now lives and works. She has published two volumes of stories, collected as Yesterday's Weather, one book of non-fiction, Making Babies, and four novels, most recently The Gathering, which was the Irish Novel of the Year, and won the Irish Fiction Award and the 2007 Man Booker Prize.

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Roopa Farooki
The Flying Man

Headline Review

Meet Maquil – also known as Mike, Mehmet, Mikhail and Miguel – a chancer and charlatan. A criminally clever man who tells a good tale, trading on his charm and good looks, reinventing himself with a new identity and nationality in each successive country he makes home, abandoning wives and children and careers in the process. He's a compulsive gambler – driven to lose at least as much as he gains, in games of chance, and in life. A damaged man in search of himself.

From the day he was delivered in Lahore, Pakistan, alongside his stillborn twin, he proved he was a born survivor. He has been a master of flying escapes, from Cairo to Paris, from London to Hong Kong, humbled by love, outliving his peers, and ending up old and alone in a budget hotel in Biarritz some eighty years later. His chequered history is catching up with him; his tracks have been uncovered and his latest wife, his children, his creditors and former business associates all want to pin him down. But even at the end, Maqil just can't resist trying it on; he's still playing his game, and the game won't be over until it's been won.

Roopa Farooki was born in Lahore, Pakistan and brought up in London. She has written four previous novels to great critical acclaim and has been nominated for the Orange Award for New Writers, and longlisted for the Orange Prize and the Impac Dublin Literary Award. Her novels have been published internationally and translated into eleven languages. She lives in south-east England and south-west France with her husband, twin baby girls and two sons.

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Jaimy Gordon
Lord of Misrule

Quercus

Indian Mound Downs, West Virginia: a downtrodden racetrack as dusty and dilapidated as the characters tied to it; characters who think they've seen everything the cheap sport of claim racing has to offer.

Until August 1970, that is, when Tommy Hansel comes to town. Hansel – handsome, hypnotic and hot under the collar – has a scheme in his head and a scam up his sleeve. Get in, get rich, get out. It's a sure thing.

But Hansel soon learns what the old-timers already know – there is no such thing as a sure thing, let alone a quick out. Especially since his girlfriend, Maggie, has piqued the interest of two local gangsters.

Jaimy Gordon was born in Baltimore. Throughout her writing career she has published novels, poetry, plays, short stories and essays. She teaches at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo and in the Prague Summer Program for Writers, and received an Academy-Institute Award for her fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Lord of Misrule is her fourth novel, and was awarded the National Book Award for Fiction 2010.

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Georgina Harding
Painter of Silence

Bloomsbury

Iasi, Romania, the early 1950s. A man is found on the steps of hospital, frail as a fallen bird. He carries no identification and utters no words, and it is days before anyone discovers that he is deaf and mute. And then a young nurse called Safta brings paper and pencils with which he can draw. Slowly, painstakingly, memories appear on the page: a hillside, a stable, a car, a country house, dogs and mirrored rooms and samovars in what is now a lost world.

The memories are Safta's also. For the man is Augustin, son of the cook at the manor at Poiana that was her family home. Born six months apart, they grew up with a connection that bypassed words. But while Augustin's world remained the same size, Safta's expanded to embrace languages, society – and love, as Augustin watched one long hot summer, in the form of a fleeting young man in a green Lagonda.

Safta left before the war, Augustin stayed. But even in the wide hills and valleys around Poiana he did not escape its horrors. He watched uncomprehending as armies passed through the place. Then the Communists came, and he found himself their unlikely victim. There are many things that he must tell Safta that may be more than simple drawings can convey.

Georgina Harding is the author of two novels: The Solitude of Thomas Cave and The Spy Game, a BBC Book at Bedtime and shortlisted for the Encore Award. Her first book was a work of non-fiction, In Another Europe, recording a journey she made across Romania in 1988 during the worst times of the Ceausescu regime. It was followed by Tranquebar: A Season in South India, which documented the lives of the people in a small fishing village on the Coromandel coast. Georgina Harding lives in London and on a farm in the Stour Valley, Essex.

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Jane Harris
Gillespie and I

Faber and Faber

As she sits in her Bloomsbury home, with her two birds for company, elderly Harriet Baxter sets out to relate the story of her acquaintance, over four decades previously, with Ned Gillespie, a talented artist who never achieved the fame that she maintains he deserved.

Back in 1888, the young, art-loving Harriet arrives in Glasgow at the time of the International Exhibition. After a chance encounter, she befriends the Gillespie family and soon becomes a fixture in all of their lives. But when tragedy strikes – leading to a notorious criminal trial – the promise and certainties of this world all too rapidly disintegrate into mystery and deception.

Jane Harris was born in Belfast and brought up in Glasgow. Her debut novel, The Observations – published in over twenty territories – was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction, and she was also shortlisted for the British Book Awards Waterstone's Newcomer of the Year and The Times/The South Bank Show Breakthrough Award. She lives in London with her husband Tom.

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Francesca Kay
The Translation of the Bones

Weidenfeld & Nicolson

Reality or delusion? Fantasy or fact? When word gets out that Mary-Margaret O'Reilly, a slow-witted but apparently harmless young woman, may have been witness to a miracle, religious mania descends on the Church of the Sacred Heart in Battersea. The consequences will be profound, not only for Mary-Margaret but for others too – Father Diamond, the parish priest, who is in the midst of his own crisis of faith, and Stella Morrison, adrift in her marriage and aching for her ten-year-old son, away at boarding school. In the same parish Alice Armitage counts the days until her soldier son comes home from Afghanistan, and Mary-Margaret’s mother, Fidelma, imprisoned in a tower block, stares out over London with nothing but her thoughts for company. Remembering her early childhood by the sea in Ireland, the bleak institution she was sent to and the boy she loved, she hungers for consoling touch. In the meantime Mary-Margaret's quest grows increasingly desperate. But no-one is prepared for the shocking outcome that ensues.

Francesca Kay grew up in South-east Asia and India and has subsequently lived in Jamaica, the United States and Germany. Her first novel, An Equal Stillness, won the Orange Award for New Writers, and was shortlisted for the Authors' Club First Novel Award and for Best First Book in the Commonwealth Writers' Prize (Europe and South Asia region). She lives with her family in Oxford.

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A.L. Kennedy
The Blue Book

Jonathan Cape

Elizabeth Barker is crossing the Atlantic by liner with her perfectly adequate boyfriend, Derek, who might be planning to propose. In fleeing the UK – temporarily – Elizabeth may also be in flight from her past and the charismatic Arthur, once her partner in what she came to see as a series of crimes. Together they acted as fake mediums, perfecting the arcane skills practised by effective frauds.

Elizabeth finally rejected what once seemed an intoxicating game. Arthur continued his search for the right way to do wrong. He now subsidises free closure for the traumatised and dispossessed by preying on the super-rich. The pair still meet occasionally, for weekends of sexual oblivion, but their affection lacerates as much as it consoles.

She hadn't, though, expected the other man on the boat. As her voyage progresses, Elizabeth's past is revealed, codes slowly form and break as communication deepens. It's time for her to discover who are the true deceivers and who are the truly deceived.

The author of five previous novels, two books of non-fiction and five collections of short stories, A.L. Kennedy's last novel, Day, was the 2007 Costa Book of the Year. She has twice been selected as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists and has won a host of other awards. She lives in Glasgow and is a part-time lecturer in creative writing at Warwick University.

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Erin Morgenstern
The Night Circus

Harvill Secker

In 1886, a mysterious travelling circus becomes an international sensation. Open only at night, constructed entirely in black and white, Le Cirque des Rêves delights all who wander its circular paths and warm themselves at its bonfire.

Although there are acrobats, fortune-tellers and contortionists, the Circus of Dreams is no conventional spectacle. Some tents contain clouds, some ice. The circus seems almost to cast a spell over its aficionados, who call themselves the rêveurs - the dreamers. At the heart of the story is the tangled relationship between two young magicians, Celia, the enchanter's daughter, and Marco, the sorcerer's apprentice. At the behest of their shadowy masters, they find themselves locked in a deadly contest, forced to test the very limits of the imagination, and of their love….

Erin Morgenstern is a writer and artist who describes all her work as being 'fairy tales in one way or another'. She lives in Massachusetts.

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Madeline Miller
The Song of Achilles

Bloomsbury

Greece in the age of Heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to Phthia to live in the shadow of King Peleus and his strong, beautiful son, Achilles. By all rights their paths should never cross, but Achilles takes the shamed prince as his friend, and as they grow into young men skilled in the arts of war and medicine, their bond blossoms into something far deeper – despite the displeasure of Achilles's mother Thetis, a cruel sea goddess. But then word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped. Torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus journeys with Achilles to Troy, little knowing that the years that follow will test everything they hold dear.

Madeline Miller has a BA and MAA from Brown University in Latin and Ancient Greek, and has been teaching both for the past nine years. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama, specialising in adapting classical tales to a modern audience. The Song of Achilles is her first novel.

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Cynthia Ozick
Foreign Bodies

Atlantic Books

The collapse of her brief marriage has stalled Bea Nightingale's life, leaving her middle-aged and alone, teaching in an impoverished borough of 1950s New York. A plea from her estranged brother gives Bea the excuse to escape lassitude by leaving for Paris to retrieve a nephew she barely knows; but the siren call of Europe threatens to deafen Bea to the dangers of entangling herself in the lives of her brother's family.

Travelling from America to France, Bea leaves the stigma of divorce on the far side of the Atlantic; newly liberated, she chooses to defend her nephew and his girlfriend Lili by waging a war of letters on the brother she has promised to help. But Bea’s generosity is a mixed blessing: those she tries to help seem to be harmed, and as Bea’s family unravels around her, she finds herself once again drawn to the husband she thought she had left in the past.

Cynthia Ozick is the author of numerous acclaimed works of fiction and non-fiction. She is the former winner of the US National Book Critics Circle Award and has been shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize and the Man Booker International Prize. She currently lives in New York.

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Ann Patchett
State of Wonder

Bloomsbury

Among the tangled waterways and giant anacondas of the Brazilian Rio Negro, an enigmatic scientist is developing a drug that could alter the lives of women forever. Dr Annick Swenson's work is shrouded in mystery; she refuses to report on her progress, especially to her investor's, whose patience is fast running out. Anders Eckman, a mild-mannered lab researcher, is sent to investigate. A curt letter reporting his untimely death is all that returns.

Now Marina Singh, Anders's colleague and once a student of the mighty Dr Swenson, is their last hope. Compelled by pleas of Anders's wife, who refuses to accept that her husband is not coming home, Marina leaves the snowy plains of Minnesota and retraces her friend's steps into the heart of the South American darkness, determined to track down Dr Swenson and uncover the secrets being jealously guarded among the remotest tribes of the rainforest.

What Marina does not yet know is that, in this ancient corner of the jungle, where the muddy waters and susurrating grasses hide countless unknown perils and temptations, she will face challenges beyond her wildest imagination. Marina is no longer the student, but only time will tell if she has learnt enough.

Ann Patchett is the author of five previous novels, including Bel Canto, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction. She writes for the New York Times Magazine, Elle, GQ, the Financial Times, the Paris Review and Vogue. She lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Ali Smith
There but for the

Hamish Hamilton

Imagine you give a dinner party and a friend of a friend brings a stranger to your house as his guest. He seems pleasant enough.

Imagine that this stranger goes upstairs halfway through the dinner party and locks himself in one of your bedrooms and won't come out.

Imagine you can't move him for days, weeks, months. If ever.

This is what Miles does, in a chichi house in the historic borough of Greenwich, in the years 2009 and 2010, in There but for the. Who is Miles, then? And what does it mean, exactly, to live with other people?

Ali Smith was born in Inverness in 1962 and lives in Cambridge. She is the author of Free Love, Like, Hotel World, Other Stories and Other Stories, The Whole Story and Other Stories, The Accidental, Girl Meets Boy and The First Person and Other Stories.

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Anna Stothard
The Pink Hotel

Alma Books

A seventeen-year-old London girl flies to Los Angeles for the funeral of her mother Lily, from whom she had been separated in her childhood. After stealing a suitcase of letters, clothes and photographs from her mum's bedroom at the top of a hotel on Venice Beach, the girl spends her summer travelling around Los Angeles returning love letters and photographs to the men who had known her mother. As she discovers more about Lily's past and tries to re-enact her life, she comes to question the foundations of her own personality.

Anna Stothard lived in Los Angeles for two years before returning to London. She has written columns and articles in various national newspapers. Isabel and Rocco was her acclaimed first novel, and she is currently working on her third book.

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Stella Tillyard
Tides of War

Chatto & Windus

At the heart of this sweeping, panoramic novel, set in Regency London and Spain during the Peninsular War, stands the lively, outspoken Harriet, poised on the threshold of the adult world. Her new husband, James, is setting off to join the Duke of Wellington's troops in Spain. Left in London, she is taken under the wing of Kitty, Lady Wellington. While the women plunge into new worlds of politics, finance and science, the men face the bloody reality of the battlefield, testing their endurance to the hilt. There are betrayals on both sides, and at times it seems their love cannot endure. Their dramatic stories whirl us through the tumult of the Regency at home and abroad.

Stella Tillyard's books include Aristocrat’s: Caroline, Emily, Louisa and Sarah Lennox, 1740 – 1832; Citizen Lord: Lord Edward Fitzgerald, 1763 – 1798, and most recently A Royal Affair: George III and his Troublesome Siblings. She has lived in the USA and Italy and now lives in London.

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Amy Waldman
The Submission

William Heinemann

A jury gathers in Manhattan to select a memorial for the victims of a devastating terrorist attack. Their fraught deliberations complete, the jurors open the envelope containing the anonymous winner's name – and discover he is an American Muslim. Instantly they are cast into roiling debate about the claims of grief, the ambiguities of art, and the meaning of Islam. Their conflicted response is only a preamble to the country's.

The memorial's designer is an enigmatic, ambitious architect named Mohammad Khan. His fiercest defender on the jury is its sole widow, the self-possessed and mediagenic Claire Burwell. But when the news of his selection leaks to the press, she finds herself under pressure from outraged family members and in collision with hungry journalists, wary activists, opportunistic politicians, fellow jurors, and Khan himself – as unknowable as he is gifted. In the fight for both advantage and their ideals, all will bring the emotional weight of their own histories to bear on the urgent question of how to remember, and understand, a national tragedy.

Amy Waldman was co-chief of the South Asia bureau of the New York Times. Her fiction has appeared in The Atlantic and the Boston Review and is anthologised in The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2010. She lives with her family in Brooklyn. This is her first novel.

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2012 Orange Prize for Fiction jury panel announced

Orange Prize for Fiction Awards Ceremony: 30 May 2012

how the prize is judged

London, 12 October 2011:
Now in its seventeenth year, the Orange Prize for Fiction is the UK’s most prestigious annual book award for fiction written by a woman, celebrating excellence, innovation and accessibility and the best of outstanding international fiction in women’s writing.

Joanna Trollope, (Chair), Writer

Lisa Appignanesi, Writer, Novelist and Broadcaster

Victoria Derbyshire, Journalist and Broadcaster

Natalie Haynes, Writer and Broadcaster

Natasha Kaplinsky, Broadcaster

"This is a wonderful quartet of judges. Because of their different professions, they all have a different perspective on the power of language and ideas, and thus will bring energy and experience to our discussions.” commented, Joanna Trollope, “They are all extremely busy, so I am especially grateful to them all for agreeing to participate in judging this significant prize which has produced winners of true distinction and originality. I love the fact that it is generously and properly open to the world."

The Orange Prize for Fiction is also pleased to announce former judge, Martha Lane Fox, will be joining the Women’s Committee in 2012. The Women's Committee evolved from the group of women who founded the Prize and its role includes acting as guardians of the Prize. Martha Lane Fox has expressed how honoured she is to join the committee whose current members comprise: Kate Mosse (Co-Founder and novelist), Clare Alexander (ex publisher and literary agent), Jane Gregory (Co-Founder and literary agent), Harriet Hastings (Project Director), Susan Sandon (Co-Founder and Cornerstone MD) and Carole Welch (Publishing Director of Sceptre).

Set up in 1996 to celebrate and promote international fiction by women throughout the world to the widest range of readers possible, the Orange Prize for Fiction is awarded for the best novel of the year written by a woman. Any woman writing in English –whatever her nationality, country of residence, age or subject matter – is eligible.

The winner will receive a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze figurine known as a ‘Bessie’, created and donated by the artist Grizel Niven. Both are anonymously endowed.

Previous winners of the Orange Prize for Fiction are Helen Dunmore for A Spell of Winter (1996), Anne Michaels for Fugitive Pieces (1997), Carol Shields for Larry’s Party (1998), Suzanne Berne for A Crime in the Neighbourhood (1999), Linda Grant for When I Lived in Modern Times (2000), Kate Grenville for The Idea of Perfection (2001), Ann Patchett for Bel Canto (2002) Valerie Martin for Property (2003), Andrea Levy for Small Island (2004), Lionel Shriver for We Need to Talk about Kevin (2005), Zadie Smith for On Beauty (2006), Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for Half of a Yellow Sun (2007), Rose Tremain for The Road Home (2008), Marilyn Robinson for Home (2009), Barbara Kingsolver for The Lacuna (2010) and Téa Obreht for The Tiger’s Wife (2011).

For the 2012 Orange Prize for Fiction, novels must be published in the UK between 1st April 2011 and 31st March 2012. The prize is administered by Booktrust, the UK charity for books and reading. Orange has sponsored the prize since its inaugural year, 1996.

For more information, please visit www.orangeprize.co.uk

For press enquiries, please contact:

Alex Wilkinson at M&C Saatchi:

Tel: 020 7544 3855

Email: alex.wilkinson@mcsaatchi.com


Notes to Editors

Orange Prize for Fiction Patrons

Orange is the key brand of the France Telecom Group, one of the world's leading telecommunications operators. With almost 131 million customers, the Orange brand now covers Internet, television and mobile services in the majority of countries where the Group operates. The role of the patrons is to be an advocate for the Orange Prize for Fiction, supporting its aim of promoting the very best international fiction by women. Most of the Orange Prize patrons have been directly involved in the prize in some way, many as judges lending their time, wisdom and energy to help establish the prize as the huge success it is today.

The patrons are:

Dame Gillian Beer DBE, Professor Lisa Jardine CBE, Jude Kelly OBE, Helena Kennedy Baroness Kennedy of The Shaws QC FRSA, Sue MacGregor CBE, Jenni Murray OBE, Shami Chakrabarti CBE, Lola Young, Baroness Young of Hornsey OBE, Rosie Boycott, Liz Calder, Fi Glover, Daisy Goodwin, Muriel Gray, Paula Kahn, Martha Kearney, Kirsty Lang, Sheena McDonald, Penny Perrick, Dame Gail Rebuck DBE, Gillian Shephard, Baroness Shephard of Northwold, Ahdaf Soueif, Sandi Toksvig and Polly Toynbee.

About Orange UK

Orange is the key brand of the France Telecom Group, one of the world's leading telecommunications operators. With almost 131 million customers, the Orange brand now covers Internet, television and mobile services in the majority of countries where the Group operates.

In the UK, Orange provides high quality GSM coverage to 99% of the UK population, and 3G coverage to more than 93%.

Orange and any other Orange product or service names included in this material are trade marks of Orange Brand Services Limited.

On July 1 2010, the company became part of Everything Everywhere, one company that runs two of Britain's most famous brands - Orange UK and T-Mobile UK - with plans to transform the industry by giving customers instant access to everything, everywhere, offering them the best value, best choice and best network coverage in the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is the UK’s biggest communications company, with a combined customer base of almost 28 million people and more than 720 retail stores across the country. Everything Everywhere Limited is registered at Hatfield Business Park, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9BW under the registered company number 02382161.

For more information please call the Orange Press Office 0870 3731500, or visit www.orange.co.uk/newsroom

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Key dates

Upcoming events

How to Get Your Novel Published: Orange and Grazia Evening for Aspiring Writers

Monday 28 May 2012

Purcell Room at Southbank Centre, 6.45pm

Whether you have written your first draft, or are yet to write the first sentence join Orange and Grazia at a special writers' evening, chaired by Orange Prize co-founder and bestselling novelist, Kate Mosse, to get the best advice in the publishing business.

An event of two parts, the first sees Kate in discussion with bestselling author Rosamund Lupton, whose 2010 debut novel ‘Sister’ has sold over half a million copies to date and was featured on Richard and Judy's Book Club and Radio 4's Book at Bedtime. Rosamund will be discussing her creative inspiration and how she finally got the novel she had been writing for five years published.

Kate Mosse will then chair an interactive 'Writers' Clinic' where you can grill a panel of publishing experts – including leading agents and publishers - about how to get your first book published.

Orange Prize Shortlist Readings at Southbank Centre

Tuesday 29 May 2012

Queen Elizabeth Hall, 7.30pm

The Orange Prize Readings offer you exclusive readings and discussions with each of the shortlisted writers. The Prize always features a vibrant and varied shortlist of women writers, emphasised by last year's sold-out event and by Téa Obreht, who won the award for 'The Tiger's Wife'.

This year's event is introduced by the Orange Prize Chair of Judges.

Buy tickets here

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